Category: News

X PlusOne kickstarter project – is it a Drone or a Plane?

X PlusOne kickstarter project – is it a Drone or a Plane?

December 28, 2014 12:31 | By | Add a Comment

Is it a drone? Is it a plane? No, it is the X PlusOne, a kickstarter project from team xcraft looking for backers to support the mass production of what seems to be a combination of multirotor agility together with a fixed wing speed and efficiency. Obviously drawing it’s inspiration of google’s project wing, this ariel machine (DronePlane? PlaneDrone?) can do VTOL, reach claimed speeds of 100 KPH and carry ariel photography cameras such as the GoPro and a gimbal. If proper funding goes right for the developers, they would add autonomous capabilities using the popular Pixhawk flight controller (offered by 3D-Robotics).

Want to support this project? Check out the kickstarter page here.  Also checkout the video after the break.

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FPVStyle Unicorn 1 combo features interesting video goggles

FPVStyle Unicorn 1 combo features interesting video goggles

December 25, 2014 20:15 | By | 5 Comments

Warning: The retailer mentioned in this article appears to not be fulfilling orders. See our news on this for more details.

So, www.fpvstyle.com is selling a kit for USD 499.- containing a mini FPV quadcopter and video goggles. The specs on the quad sound pretty alright, even though we don’t know the flight controller it does have GPS and uses SimonK firmware on the ESCs and a claimed flight time of 15 minutes on 2200mAh 3S batteries.

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So far so mildly interesting. Until you see that they’ve finally caught on to the day and age of the Oculus Rift, and done away with the now-obsolete FPV goggles we’re used to. It’s a giant pair of goggles with a wide field of view! Check out the closeups after the break!

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FPV Central is looking for RC FPV enthusiasts

FPV Central is looking for RC FPV enthusiasts

December 22, 2014 14:56 | By | Add a Comment

Hello there, Josef here. I’m adressing you in person in a kind of editorial to ask for your help.

You may have noticed a distinct lack of articles and reviews in recent past. That’s mostly due to lack of time and other constraints. fpvcentral.net is a hobby endeavour, and I’ve always tried my best to provide objective reviews in a time when most RC publications are either determined by sponsors, or focus more on providing entertainment rather than actual information. As of now, if you pick up an RC magazine and look for reviews on, for example, RTF multicopter products, chances are good that any article you find will either be influenced by the magazine’s need for free review samples, or a lack of experience by the reviewer, or both. How often have we read reviews that mentioned that a plane flies “straight and true, with just one or two clicks of trim”. Or read multicopter reviews by a writer whose only prior experience was a DJI Phantom. Or reviews where the text reads more like an afterthought, written against a deadline without the model ever having actually flown.

Reviewing FPV gear is difficult. You need some experience, and preferably a solid background in the field of electronics and radio transmissions. Reviewing multicopters isn’t something anyone can do either – most RC journalists started only one or two years ago, and are basically following the mainstream. I’m a licensed radio amateur, I hold a degree in electronics and I’m building systems for flight, air traffic control and space for a living. I’m running this site because I enjoy the hobby – not to rake in money from sponsors or advertisers.

I won’t claim that this site is the best available resource, as there’s plenty of great sites that provide a lot of valuable information to hobbyists. However, I hope that fpvcentral.net adds to that – and judging from the popularity of articles such as our $120 high power quadcopter howto, or our KK 2.0 flight controller review, I like to think that this site is indeed a valuable resource to RC modelers around the world.

Over the past year, I’ve had less time available for FPVCentral than I’d wanted. In addition, there’s been a disturbing trend of commercially run and sponsored RC “review sites” taking crops of our review photos, and in a few cases, even copying complete reviews from fpvcentral.net. In one instance the review was copied verbatim, in another it was translated to french. In all of these cases, the content was presented as their original work, without attributing fpvcentral.net. And I have to admit, it is a bit demotivating to see certain sites grow using blatantly stolen content.

I’m running this site out of my own pocket, in my spare time, and all the review hardware was bought by myself. I’m certainly going to continue, and there’s a number of articles lined up that will go online over the holidays.

However, I’d love to get more people involved. I’m looking for enthusiasts who love to write reviews, post news, even editorials about any aspect of RC flight. For FPVCentral to grow, there needs to be more variety. If you are interested in joining up, please let me know via the contact form.

 

South Park covers drones…

South Park covers drones…

October 30, 2014 20:53 | By | Add a Comment

“Shock and outrage all over the states tonight after an armed police drone shot down an unarmed civilian drone. And worst of all: Yes, the civilian drone… was black.”

The episode is a bit technically optimistic, and it doesn’t really get into the actual problems of civilian UAV regulations in the US, but it is worth a few laughs. If you haven’t seen this episode yet, you can watch it right here on the official site.

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FTDI Windows driver bricks counterfeit chips, FTDI pulls update, shows little remorse

FTDI Windows driver bricks counterfeit chips, FTDI pulls update, shows little remorse

October 27, 2014 12:40 | By | Add a Comment

FTDI chips are used in a big number of multirotor flight controller boards, converting between USB and serial communication. And because of their relatively high price, many counterfeit versions of their chips are found on the market. The counterfeits often look exactly like the real thing, so you’d have to look at the chip die to identify them.

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In the past years, FTDI have responded by issuing driver updates that refuse to work with counterfeit chips. However the (mostly chinese) producers of these clones have learned to adapt.

In one of the recent windows updates, FTDI have pushed an update that sets the product ID of any counterfeit chip connected to a windows PC with that new driver to zero, effectively bricking the chip. This has had the electronics and maker communities up in arms, because you can’t really “choose” whether to buy a real or a counterfeit chip. Needless to say, bricking consumer devices is legally questionable at best. Now FTDI have retracted the driver from Windows Update, and issued an apology letter of sorts…

We’ll leave it up to Dave Jones from eevblog.com to sum it all up in a very juicy video after the break. If you own a multirotor flight controller with a USB interface, it’s recommended that you uninstall the latest FTDI driver, and install an older version. Keep in mind that connecting your board to the computer is enough to brick the chip if you have the latest (now-retracted) driver installed.

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Dronecode: a drone software project by the Linux Foundation

Dronecode: a drone software project by the Linux Foundation

October 13, 2014 11:46 | By | Add a Comment

The Linux Foundation has launched a new collaborative project called Dronecode, which aims to bring together open source projects and commercial vendors for the development of new open source flight control software for all kinds of civilian UAVs.

So far, so uninteresting. But reading the list of participants shows just how much potential this new initiative has: Among APM-developer 3DRobotics, Yuneec, Baidu and Intel there’s also DroneDeploy, JDrones, Qualcomm and Walkera on board.

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FPV Drone Racing is as awesome as it sounds

FPV Drone Racing is as awesome as it sounds

October 7, 2014 11:55 | By | Add a Comment

The video is so very very french. But when a group of FPV enthusiasts gather to fly a friendly racing competition in the middle of the woods, you can’t help but smile. The footage is breathtaking and this could very well become a very popular and interesting regular event.

PS: No stab at the french implied. We’re all Fou le fafa 🙂

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Fatshark Spyhawk Bundle by Hobbyking

Fatshark Spyhawk Bundle by Hobbyking

September 1, 2014 11:35 | By | Add a Comment

Let’s face it, the Hubsan Spyhawk is not the most amazing piece of RC gear that you could get. For pure beginners it does have its virtues however. The experience was hampered by an inflated price (early sets sold for as much as 400 dollars) and a stabilization system that could not be disabled. That the original transmitter had an extremely short battery life didn’t help either.

Hobbyking is now offering a package that includes the Hubsan Spyhawk v2, the Fatshark Teleporter v3 goggles, a 5.8GHz Fatshark-compatible video transmission system with cloverleaf antenna, and the console-controller sized Hubsan transmitter without integrated TFT screen. The whole package retails for USD 299.-

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All things considered, that price tag is decent. The goggles aren’t going to rock your world (and with Oculus-sized FOV goggles soon to become the norm, the current 40-ish degree FOV goggles are going to be obsolete by next year), the transmitter is basically a toy, and the Spyhawk itself isn’t the most amazing plane there is – but as whole, that’s not a bad package for beginners.

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Copycat Pixhawk with GPS is cheap

Copycat Pixhawk with GPS is cheap

August 9, 2014 20:35 | By | Add a Comment

Pining for a Pixhawk? The pricetag sure is hefty, at the time of writing 3DR wants $280.- for it if you also buy the GPS antenna/compass module. If that’s too rich for you, Goodluckbuy now has a knockoff Pixhawk, with GPS, for just shy of USD $150.-

Is it worth getting this instead of the original? You decide! However, note that even the safety switch shows that there’s definitely difference in build quality there:

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If you need a pixhawk on a budget and you don’t mind the risk, you can order one at GLB right here.

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TBS Gemini FPV Racer announced

TBS Gemini FPV Racer announced

August 7, 2014 13:47 | By | Add a Comment

Team Blacksheep are pushing more and more into custom designed multirotors. Their latest project is the Gemini, a miniature FPV hexacopter with forward-tilted motors – specifically designed for racing.

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Preorders will be fulfilled in two batches, with the first to arrive end of September. Price is around USD $600.- for the RTF version that includes everything except receiver and transmitter.

Check out the video and more details after the break.

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Rescue organization loses against FAA drone ban

Rescue organization loses against FAA drone ban

July 19, 2014 13:02 | By | 2 Comments

The US rescue organization Texas Equusearch, an NGO founded by the father of a missing child, has lost a court case against the FAA’s recently released interpretation of the law on UAVs. They lost not because of factual evidence, but because the FAA’s release is the “legal opinion of the FAA” and not a “decision with legal ramnifications”.

This line of reasoning is quite interesting because the FAA is already sending cease and desist letters and emails to organizations known to use UAVs, so it’s kinda difficult to argue that the FAA was just stating an opinion vis-a-vis acting upon it.

The FAA’s side of the story is that they’re keeping the skies safe etc. etc. – not an unreasonable point to make, just not related to the issue at hand. After all, it’s not like drones aren’t already part of aviation today, so broadly restricting civilian use due to “possible safety issues” is not really a compelling argument while military flight tests are sometimes not even filed beforehand.

UPDATE: To clarify, and because vice.com missed the point of the court ruling entirely, and a blog post on dyidrones quoted vice.com verbatim: The court threw out the Equusearch vs. FAA case beforehand because they said the cease and desist letters were not “real” cease and desist letters under the law, and thus don’t trigger the possibility to sue against. Vice is incorrect when they say that Equusearch has “won” anything. On the contrary, there is now no way to legally challenge the FAA position until after they fined someone under these new “interpretations”.  If anything, the FAA won, because their motion to dismiss was granted.

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NZ RC enthusiast forbidden from testing his selfmade Sense and Avoid system

NZ RC enthusiast forbidden from testing his selfmade Sense and Avoid system

July 4, 2014 14:04 | By | 1 Comment

Bruce Simpson, aka XJet on youtube, was planning to test his long-promised “Sense and Avoid” system. This system was meant to allow UAVs to sense approaching vehicles and prevent collisions between FPV UAVs and other models or full size aircraft. His plan was to use low-power 2.4GHz transmissions as a sort of cheap radar system. Asking for permission to perform these tests on the local Tokoroa airfield yielded a hard “no” from the New Zealand Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) and the South Waikato District Council (SWDC).

To quote Bruce:

They claim that the mere 35mW transmissions on the 2.4GHz band associated with my SAA testing would make flying RC model jets unacceptably risky – yet the very people flying them are all wandering around with wifi-enabled smartphones capable of putting out 200mW each on the same frequencies, and the average microwave oven in nearby houses may churn out almost a watt of noise by way of leakage — or at least that’s what Wikipedia claims here:

Bruce is by no means an unknown person in the RC community. He’s best known for his original pulsejet designs, the pulsejet go-cart, and his audacious plans to publish a book on how to build a DIY cruise missile, which resulted in him getting slapped with everything from letters from the US embassy to sudden tax fraud investigations.

Link to the local newspaper article and a video message from Bruce after the break.

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FAA updates rules on model aircraft

FAA updates rules on model aircraft

June 26, 2014 18:42 | By | 1 Comment

This news article from the FAA website is bad news for RC model pilots. If you remember the rather stringent rules laid out for RC enthusiasts in Austria, this will be very familiar to you.

In the notice, the FAA restates the law’s definition of “model aircraft,” including requirements that they not interfere with manned aircraft, be flown within sight of the operator and be operated only for hobby or recreational purposes. The agency also explains that model aircraft operators flying within five miles of an airport must notify the airport operator and air traffic control tower.

The FAA reaffirms that the Act’s model aircraft provisions apply only to hobby or recreation operations and do not authorize the use of model aircraft for commercial operations. The notice gives examples of hobby or recreation flights, as well as examples of operations that would not meet that definition.

The main thrust of the Interpretation Document (PDF) is this: RC model flight is meant for recreational purposes only. Any commercial use, monetization, flight beyond LOS or without the pilot having eyes on the craft, or flights for any reason other than your own personal recreation is strictly prohibited without a UAV license.

This means FPV flight is illegal in the USA, plain and simple. Doesn’t matter if you have a spotter. The Pilot’s eyes have to be on the model.

Are you a sponsored pilot? Then this bit is relevant to you as well:

Any operation not conducted strictly for hobby or recreation purposes could not be operated under the special rule for model aircraft. Clearly, commercial operations would not be hobby or recreation flights.
Likewise, flights that are in furtherance of a business, or incidental to a person’s business, would not be a hobby or recreation flight.
Flights conducted incidental to, and within the scope of, a business where no common carriage is involved, generally may operate under FAA’s general operating rules of part 91.
Although they are not commercial operations conducted for compensation or hire, such operations do not qualify as a hobby or recreation flight because of the nexus between the operator’s business and the operation of the aircraft.

Now is the time to act. The FAA is inviting comments, so be sure to make your voice heard. The AMA has already objected to the new developments.

Sadly, we here in Austria did not have a modeler’s lobbying group pushing for our rights. If you live in the US, please don’t repeat our mistake. Act now.

UPDATE: AMA response here (PDF).

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Parrot Bepop is a GPS-enhanced RTF camera quadcopter

Parrot Bepop is a GPS-enhanced RTF camera quadcopter

May 14, 2014 9:18 | By | Add a Comment

French company Parrot recently announced their latest product, the Bepop Drone. It’s a lightweight quadcopter with a digitally stabilized camera, eschewing mechanical gimbals in order to save weight.

The 14 megapixel camera isn’t the only attraction though, for it boasts a dual-core embedded linux flight controller with 8GB of RAM, Wifi range of up to 300 meters or, with a range extender package, going as far as 2km.  Their “SkyController” is basically a tablet dock with sticks, not exactly a brand new idea but definitely executed in an interesting fashion.

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Price is said to be above the Parrot.AR, but below the Phantom 2. Watch the official product video after the break, and check out the official website.

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FAA cracks down on UAV demonstration at Kennedy Space Center

FAA cracks down on UAV demonstration at Kennedy Space Center

May 12, 2014 9:10 | By | Add a Comment

It was planned as a rich demonstration of civilian UAV technology, but the FAA once again stepped in and made sure as few people as possible got to see it.

Last Sunday, the Exploration Park of the Kennedy Space Center was abuzz with drones of all types and sizes, thanks to the “Aerospace Research Challenge” hosted by Space Florida. The AUVSI tries to raise awareness about the commercial use of drones and the need for more open regulations. It’s a bitter irony that the very thing they are currently fighting hindered this demonstration: The FAA cracked down on the event, imposing strict rules that basically ensured that the large crowd of interested individuals got very little to see. Observers trying to see the actual flight demonstrations were ushered out by the FAA, for “safety reasons”. And even at a respectable distance observers were asked to leave.

A few TV cameras were allowed to record the actual flights. Each drone had to be controlled by two pilots, both were required to have a full pilots license plus medical flight status certification.  The FAA justified their restrictions pointing to recent incidents of careless individuals flying rc models near airports.

Tomorrow, the AUVSI will host the Unmanned Systems 2014 in Orlando, where the topic of current US regulations is going to be a hot topic.

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